Parenting Articles

The professionals at Center for Developing Minds are frequent contributors to blogs and articles, writing on a variety of topics for parents, caregivers, educators and clinicians. A sample of their work is included here. Please follow our social media accounts for the latest published pieces.

Damon Korb, M.D.

Battling Boredom

At this point, you have protected your family by sheltering in place, sanitized your house, implemented routines and clarified the house rules. You have a plan to ensure your family has the food, medicine, and toilet paper they need. Some parents have transitioned to working from home and others have set up their children’s on-line education program. You are doing your best to keep the troops entertained. Yet, it is inevitable, after being cooped up in one place with the same people — day after day — sooner or later boredom will eventually creep in.

First of all, do not fear your child’s boredom. Boredom is important.

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Damon Korb, M.D.

Working, Parenting, and Sheltering in Place

For the fortunate parents who are able to transition their job to work from home during the current coronavirus shutdown, you are inevitably discovering how challenging it is to work and parent at the same time. It is important to recognize that your work productivity is probably going to take a hit during this shutdown. Adjust and set more realistic expectations for you and your family.

The following are age appropriate suggestions to help keep your family moving forward during this unprecedented situation.Tips to reduce frustration and get some work done.

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Damon Korb, M.D.

Parenting in a Pandemic

It is a well-known fact that children thrive when there are routines. The daily life for most children is pretty mapped out and organized. But, as children suddenly need to stay sequestered home due to this unprecedented response to the coronavirus, unless parents are planful, it is easy for the structure to fall apart. When structure falls apart, restlessness sets in and chaos can take over.

Staying organized is the key to keeping your sanity.

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Damon Korb, M.D.

5 Ways to Outsmart Your Kids So They Finally Do Their Chores

With the right tactics, you don’t have to fight with your children about helping out around the house. If you are continually nagging your children about chores, take this first step: Stop using the word "chores." It conjures up a negative connotation. Instead think about them as developmental lessons that your children need to learn. While helpful to the family, a primary purpose of chores is to help children acquire new skills, such as learning about order, time management and being helpful.

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Cassandra Harms, LMFT

Emotional Regulation and Your Child

Emotional regulation is one of the most important aspects of having a quality life. The skill of knowing how to self soothe and manage intense emotions affects all aspects of our lives. For instance, if one of our children melts down constantly, this can cause strain on the family unit. Likewise, if our child has trouble being flexible or tantrums every time a playdate does not go their way, it will be difficult for the child to have friends.

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Makenzie Wesner, NP

How to Help Your Young Child Cope with Anxiety

As children grow, they engage in exploration and learning that challenges them to become increasingly independent. This can be a simultaneously exciting and frightening process. An anxious child may feel afraid to leave Mom or Dad’s side on the first day of preschool, nervous to take that initial jump into the deep end of the pool, fearful of the unfamiliar.

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Damon Korb, M.D.

The Art of Raising an Organized Child

Organized children do not suddenly appear – they are raised. Training the brain to think orderly begins during infancy and continues in adolescence and into early adulthood. When children are young they learn where things go and when to do tasks, but as they grow older, the expectations of life become increasingly complicated. Planning and problem solving skills are needed to navigate school, work, and relationships. 

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Damon Korb, M.D.

Delivering Difficult News to Young Children

When tragedy happens, no matter how big or small, instinctively parents want to protect their young children from the pain of bad news. At the same time, one important parenting job is to prepare our kids for life. We want them to become resilient because bad things happen; favorite toys get lost, pets die, friends move away, parents get divorced, people get sick, and natural disasters occur

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Marisa LaScala with Damon Korb, M.D.

Your Kids Should Make Their Own Lunches Starting in Third Grade, This Doctor Says

In the daily bustle of getting kids ready for school, everyone has a mental checklist of items they have to take care of before getting out the door. Brush teeth? Check. Make sure everyone knows where their shoes are? Check. Make sure you have your phone/wallet/keys? Check, check, check. The key to making it all go smoothly is to make sure your checklist isn't overflowing with 20,000 items that you, personally, have to keep track of per day.

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